Early Christianity, Revelation, and the Gospels

bible study
CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK
CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK

The Book of Daniel

The book of Daniel is the only full-fledged apocalyptic writing in the Old Testament. It contains a series of visions (Dan 7–12) that may have been recorded at the time of the Maccabean revolt against the Seleucid Empire in the years 167–164 BC. In Daniel 7, Daniel sees four great beasts coming up out of the sea. These are explained to be the four kingdoms to which the Jews had been subjected, but the book draws its symbols from ancient myths and suggests the beasts are embodiments of primeval chaos. Daniel then sees the Most High depicted as an ancient figure seated on an amazing throne and surrounded by thousands of holy ones or angels. He presides over a judgment, and the fourth kingdom (representing the Greeks or perhaps Rome) is condemned to burn in the fire. Then the kingdom is given to one like a son of man who comes on the clouds—an identification used elsewhere in the OT for Yahweh (e.g., Isa 19:1).

The symbolism and function of Daniel’s visions become more specific in Daniel 10–12. The angel Gabriel appears to Daniel, telling him that he is engaged in a struggle in heaven against the “princes” of Persia and Greece, and that there is no one to help him but “Michael, your prince” (Dan 10:21). He proceeds to tell Daniel what is written in the book of truth—the whole course of history in the Hellenistic period (ca. 330–168 BC) through the persecution of the Jews by King Antiochus IV Epiphanes of Syria. (The book was likely completed before the death of Antiochus Epiphanes in 164 BC.)

The revelation of Daniel concludes by looking beyond history to the resurrection of the dead. Some will rise to eternal life, some to shame and contempt. The “wise” who died for their faith in the time of persecution will shine like the brightness of the heavens, or the firmament; they will become companions to the stars or the host of heaven (Dan 12:1–4). This is a clear reference to resurrection in the Hebrew Bible. In Israelite religion up to this point, salvation primarily meant living long in the promised land and seeing one’s children’s children. After the time of Daniel’s writing—at least in the apocalyptic tradition—salvation meant to live forever with the angels in heaven. Belief in resurrection was especially powerful in times of persecution when people were being killed for keeping their faith.

 

Bible Questions and Answers,
Bible Questions and Answers,

Other Jewish Apocalyptic Literature

Some of Daniel’s imagery parallels ancient Near Eastern mythology (beasts rising from the sea, the figure riding on the clouds, etc.) and some parallels earlier passages in the Hebrew Bible, especially in the later prophetic passages. A good example is Isaiah 24–27, which says that God will punish Leviathan, the twisting serpent, and will slay the dragon that is in the sea (Isa 27:1). There is no particular story in the Old Testament about Leviathan or the dragon—they are only mentioned in passing or as a general force against Yahweh’s work—but they are featured in Canaanite myths from the second millennium BC.

In addition to Daniel, the cluster of extra-biblical writings known collectively as 1 Enoch also illustrates individual judgment and afterlife. In Genesis, Enoch is among the seventh generation after Adam, before the flood. He was said to walk with God, and Genesis 5:24 says God “took” Enoch, likely meaning that Enoch ascended to heaven while still alive. He was, then, uniquely placed to reveal the mysteries of heaven. Dated from the second century BC, the collective writings known as 1 Enoch describe both the mysteries of the universe and the whole course of history, from creation to the final judgment.

Jewish apocalyptic writings can be divided broadly into two types: first, historical apocalypses, typified by Daniel, which are concerned with the course of history and its final resolution. Then there are otherworldly journeys, mainly heavenly ascents, in which the visionary passes through the heavens and sees the abodes of the dead. The Book of the Watchers (1 Enoch 1–36) is a prime example of this type of apocalypse.

Another cluster of apocalypses (e.g., the extra-biblical books 2 Esdras and 2 Baruch) appeared in the period immediately after the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans. In these revelations, consolation comes from the hope that Rome will eventually be overthrown, Jerusalem restored, and the righteous freed to enjoy eternal life in heaven. Most of these apocalypses were not preserved in the Jewish tradition, but they survived in Greek, Latin, Syriac, or Ethiopic translations. Many more Jewish apocalypses likely existed that were not translated and did not survive. Fragments of the books of Enoch in Aramaic were found in the Dead Sea Scrolls, as were fragments of several other apocalyptic writings that were previously unknown. Moreover, the Dead Sea Scrolls show that apocalyptic ideas—such as the expectation of a war between the good and evil—were widespread even if they were not expressed in writings formally recognized as apocalypses.

 

Bible Trivia Answers
Bible Trivia Answers

Early Christianity, Revelation, and the Gospels

To a great degree, these apocalyptic writings provide context for the writings and beliefs of early Christianity. Belief in the resurrection of Jesus Christ, for instance, was crucial for the development of Christianity. Yet, as Paul makes clear, “If there is no resurrection of the dead, then Christ has not been raised either” (1 Cor 15:13). The belief that Jesus was resurrected builds on the apocalyptic view of the end of history. Christ was the firstfruit of the resurrection, the beginning of the general resurrection. Paul expected that when Christ returned, those who were left alive would be caught up to meet Him in the air (1 Thess 4:17).

By far the most elaborate apocalyptic writing in the NT is the book of Revelation, which includes a series of revelations received by John of Patmos. Some of the imagery derives from Daniel. John sees a beast rising from the sea (Rev 13:1) and another from the earth. For John, the beasts represent the Roman Empire, which is also symbolized by the great prostitute of Babylon, riding on a beast, in Revelation 17. In Revelation 19, however, Christ appears from heaven, riding a white horse and wielding a sword from his mouth (Rev 19:11–15). Satan is imprisoned for 1,000 years (Rev 20:2), and the righteous dead are raised to reign on earth for the same period (Rev 20:4–5). At the end of this period, Satan is released temporarily (Rev 20:7)—before his end in the lake of fire (Rev 20:10)—and all the dead are raised for judgment (Rev 20:12). Death and Hades, the underworld, are thrown into a lake of fire (Rev 20:14), and a new heaven and a new earth appear (Rev 21:1).

The Gospels suggest that Jesus, like John, was thoroughly apocalyptic. Mark 13 is often called “the little apocalypse.” There, Jesus predicts great upheavals at the end of the age, after which the Son of Man will appear on the clouds. In addition to its appearance in Daniel 7, the motif of the Son of Man sitting on the throne of glory also appears in the Similitudes of Enoch (1 Enoch 37–71), a Jewish apocalypse from the first half of the first century AD. In apocalyptic language, Matthew 16 describes a judgment scene in which Jesus, as the Son of Man, comes again in the glory of God the Father with His angels and offers mercy to those who chose to follow Him (Mt 16:24–28).

JOHN J. COLLINS

Further Reading

Daniel, Book of LBD

Revelation, Book of LBD

Enoch, First Book of LBD

Enoch, Second Book of LBD

How to Study the Bible

Biblical Theology

Collins, J. J. (2012, 2016). Apocalyptic Literature. In Faithlife Study Bible. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press.

Spirit and Flesh

Spirit and Flesh
Spirit and Flesh
Spirit and Flesh
Spirit and Flesh
Spirit and Flesh

Simon Peter

Simon Peter was one of the three members of Jesus’ inner-circle (Mark 5:37; 9:2; Matt 17:1–3). He was a fisherman (Matt 4:18; Mark 1:16; Luke 5:1–7; John 21:3), preacher (Acts 2:14–40), miracle worker (Acts 3:1–10, 9:32–42), prophet (Acts 5:1–11), and author (1 Pet 1:1; 2 Pet 1:1). Originally called Simon, he was later renamed Peter by Jesus (Mark 3:16), which means “rock” or “stone” (kephas in Aramaic; petros in Greek). The New Testament also refers to him as Simeon (Acts 15:14), the “son of John” (John 1:42; 21:15–17), and “son of Jonah” (Matt 16:17).

One of the more celebrated statements by Peter is his confession of Jesus as “the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matt 16:16). In Matthew’s account, Jesus responds by saying it is “on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overpower it” (Matt 16:18).

All four gospels include Peter’s denial of his association with Jesus (Matt 26:69–75; Mark 14:66–72; Luke 22:54–62; John 18:17, 25–27). In Mark 14:72, he weeps, experiencing inward conflict and self-awareness. Of the Gospels, only the Gospel of John directly recounts Peter being restored, with his triple declaration of his love for Jesus and his commissioning by Jesus to shepherd of His flock (John 21:15–17).

The first 12 chapters of the book of Acts are dominated by events related to Peter and his involvement in the early church. Peter is imprisoned for preaching (Acts 12:3) and is later released by an angel (Acts 12:7–10). If Acts is chronologically arranged, Peter is the first to preach to and convert Gentiles after being guided by a vision of a sheet containing clean and unclean animals (Acts 10:1–11:18). After his legitimization of a mission to the Gentiles, the book of Acts no longer mentions Peter (Acts 15:7–11).

In John’s Gospel, Jesus directly prophesies Peter’s future, contrasting his present freedom with his forthcoming restriction and alludes to his martyrdom (John 21:18–19). Early church tradition states that Peter was martyred during the reign of Emperor Nero (AD 64–68).

DAVID SEAL

 

Spirit and Flesh
Spirit and Flesh

Slavery in the First Century

In the Roman Empire, people were either slaves or they were free. These two statuses were central to the social and the legal fabric of the Roman world. Unlike in recent history, slavery in Rome was not based on race or ethnicity; anyone could become a slave and nearly any slave could become free. Consequently, the Roman world was composed of these two groups of people who lived and worked together and were distinguishable by their social status.

Becoming a Slave

Prior to the first century AD, the majority of slaves in the Mediterranean world were prisoners of war. By the first century, however, the primary source was through birth into the slave system. A child born to a female slave was also a slave, regardless of the status of the father. A freeborn child could also be enslaved: exposure of newborns was a practiced form of post-birth control, and these infants, who were left exposed to the elements to die, were often gathered by slave traders and sold as slaves. Children were also sometimes sold by their fathers due to the pressures of poverty.

Penal slavery was used to punish crimes committed against the state, such as evading a census, taxes, or military service. A judgment against a debtor could force a free person into slavery. In limited cases, a person might sell himself into slavery in order to improve his social standing once freedom was restored, but there is uncertainty regarding the frequency of this practice. Masters had a tremendous amount of control over slaves and there was no law guaranteeing that the master would live up to any agreement with a slave.

Living as a Slave

Slavery meant the complete loss of rights. It terminated marriage, family ties, business partnerships, and any public or private offices previously held. Slaves could neither act as debtors or creditors, nor was their testimony admissible in court unless it was gained through torture; they could be sold or loaned out at the will of the owner.

The treatment slaves received depended on their owner. Sexual abuse was not uncommon. Punishments, often cruel, included: flogging, shackling, branding of the face and forehead, iron collars, and dismemberment or maiming. There were few restraints placed upon the owner in the punishment he was allowed to inflict upon his slave who was viewed as property.

Roman laws did afford slaves some protection. Temples and statues of the emperor legally provided a place of asylum from unusually cruel masters.

Under good conditions, slavery could offer security. In theory, all of a slave’s needs were provided for by his or her owner (i.e., food, clothing, shelter, medical care). Slaves were allowed a peculium (property of their own), but since they did not have the right to possess property, the peculium technically belonged to the owner. Retirement, for those who survived, was usually at age 60; those who died while enslaved were buried at the expense of the owner.

 

Bible questions and answers
Bible questions and answers

Becoming Free

Slavery in the Roman world was not necessarily a permanent state. Emancipation was possible under certain legal stipulations. Owners were prevented, however, from releasing a slave from service directly. Both the slave and the owner were required to appear before a magistrate in a ceremony where a “freedom tax” was paid to the magistrate on top of the price already being paid for freedom.

Becoming a freedperson meant acquiring certain social and economic advantages. Former slaves owned by Roman citizens could, under certain requirements, become citizens. This new status placed them in a social level above slaves and free noncitizens, but restricted their status below that of freeborn citizens. Former slaves who remained attached to their masters’ house could receive economic and political boosts not normally available to poor free persons. Former slaves may have learned a skill that enabled them to open a business—some entered freedom with money saved.

Newly-acquired freedom also had its drawbacks. Even after freedom had been granted, a former master could still control aspects of a former slave’s life and finances. In addition to various social obligations, freedpersons could be required to work for their former master a set number of days each year. In contrast to the slave, however, the freedperson gained certain rights. The former master was required to allow the freedperson sufficient time to earn an income. Obligations of service could be reduced due to health complications, or if the former slave had reached a social position or age that was not fitting for such services. These rights, and a variety of others, protected the freedperson from being re-enslaved.

JOHN BYRON

 

 

Bible questions and answers
Bible questions and answers

Spirit and Flesh in Paul’s Letters

In Romans 6, Paul asks a rhetorical question about continuing to sin in order that grace might be multiplied. He answers this question with another: “How can we who died to sin still live in it?” (Rom 6:2). This raises the question of why believers still struggle with sin. Are some believers somehow defective?

Jesus’ death and resurrection not only conquered death once and for all, it enabled believers to have new life as well (Rom 6:4; Col 3:1–3). Paul describes a twofold division between the flesh and the spirit. The flesh refers to God’s originally perfect creation, which is now mortal and in decay as result of sin entering the world through Adam (Rom 5:12). The spirit is the essence of who we are, the part of us that lives on after our physical bodies die. In 2 Corinthians 4:16, Paul contrasts the two, stating that our outer person is being destroyed as our inner one is being renewed. Our physical bodies will continue to decay until God gives us a new, spiritual body (Rom 8:23; 1 Cor 15:39–42).

When Paul talks about being raised from the dead once we have believed in Jesus (Rom 6:4), he is talking about the spirit rather than the flesh. Second Corinthians 5:17 states, “Therefore if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; the old things have passed away; behold, new things have come.” Here, the old and new refers to our spirits.

This is where the ongoing problem of sin arises. Although someday our physical body will indeed be raised and transformed (1 Cor 15:50–52), our new spirits must dwell in our fallen bodies (Rom 8:12–14). Previously, our spirits were in bondage to sin, but now our spirits have been set free from this bondage (Rom 6:17–18). Paul is not saying that the body is bad—God created it, so he is not opposed to it—but instead is using “flesh” as a metaphor where sin resides as we await our sinless, resurrected bodies.

 

Spirit and Flesh
Spirit and Flesh

Inner Spirit and Outer Flesh

The problem of sin for believers stems from the struggle between the new inner spirit and our old sinful flesh (our old sinful self). Since our spirits are no longer slaves of sin, we must no longer obey the lusts and desires of our flesh (Rom 6:12; 8:12). Although sinful desires reside in the flesh, we must consider ourselves dead to sin (Rom 6:11; Col 3:5).

The only way we can overcome sin in this way is by walking in the Spirit. Paul says that if we live by the Spirit, we will “put to death the deeds of the body” (Rom 8:13). Where we choose to set our mind makes the difference between life and death (Rom 8:6). Living by the Spirit is the only way our new self can overcome the desires of the flesh (Gal 5:16). Paul contrasts the natural consequences of each option: the fruit of the Spirit versus the deeds of the flesh (Gal 5:19–23).

When Paul addresses this theme in his letters, he highlights the now and “not yet” tension of the Christian life. The rebirth of our inner spiritual beings enables us to live for God as He intended. But since we continue to live in our earthly bodies, we continue to engage in the battle between flesh and spirit. The key to victory is walking in the Spirit, no longer obeying the desires of the flesh. If we allow our inner spirits to obey “the flesh,” we choose to allow sin to reign over us again (Rom 6:12–13). Paul offers us hope as we wait for the “not yet.” All of creation waits with us for the same restoration and fulfillment of God’s original intention (Rom 8:18–19).

STEVEN E. RUNGE

 

What A Beautiful Name – Hillsong Worship

What A Beautiful Name - Hillsong Worship

 

CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK
CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK

 

 

Bible Study Space Network
Bible Study Space Network

Oceans – Hillsong United // Worship Cover by Tommee Profitt & Brooke Griffith

 

Priyanka Chopra, There’s no place like home

Priyanka Chopra

Priyanka Chopra

No matter where you are in the world, you can find home anywhere. All you have to do, is look a little closer. Find out how the Google Pixel 3 and its camera makes Priyanka feel at home. #PriyankaXPixel3 Now in stores: https://store.google.com/product/pixel_3

There’s no place like home… or maybe, there is. #pixel3
#PriyankaXPixel3


 
 Priyanka Chopra Visits Syrian Refugees in Jordan

 

CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK
CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK


Today on independence day,

आज सवतंत्रता दिवस पर, हम सब एक पल ठहर कर याद करे की स्वतंत्रता क्या है? और हमें इस मुक़ाम तक पोहोचाने केलिए हमने कितनी कठिनाओ का सामना किया है। स्वतंत्रता दिवस कि हार्दिक शुभकामनाएँ इंडिया। जय हिंद
Happy #IndependenceDayIndia

Today on independence day, we all have a moment to remember what is freedom? And how difficult we have faced to make us feel like this. Happy Independence Day to all india. Jay hind
Happy #IndependenceDayIndia

Living with a Fire, Kim Walker Smith

Living with a Fire, Kim Walker Smith


New Album, Living with a Fire.

Official trailer for the new Jesus Culture album, “Living With A Fire,” to be released 8/31/2018. Subscribe to Jesus Culture on YouTube: http://smarturl.it/JesusCultureSub

Pre-order the album to access exclusive content: https://jcltr.lnk.to/firealbumYD

Listen to the new songs, “Living With A Fire,” “Freedom,” and “Center Of Your Love” here: https://jcltr.lnk.to/jclivingwithafireYD

Join JC on: Instagram: http://instagram.com/jesusculture

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jesusculture

Twitter: http://twitter.com/jesusculture

Jesus Culture is a global movement, awakening hearts to worship and demonstrate the love and power of God. The members are passionate to see campuses, cities and nations transformed and they have a mandate: to raise, equip, and mobilize those who were coming to fulfill the call of God on their lives. Jesus Culture accomplishes this through the ministry of conferences, events, worship, campus ministries, curriculums, resources and now a local church. Jesus Culture is continuing to grow in bringing young people into encounters with Jesus and equipping them to minister His heart to a broken world.

In addition to collaborative music such as Love Has a Name by Jesus Culture, members of the group have released solo offerings, such as Chris McClarney’s Breakthrough, Kim Walker-Smith’s On My Side Live, Chris Quilala’s Split the Sky, and Bryan & Katie Torwalt’s latest release called Champion, to name a few.

Jesus Culture has sold more than one million albums worldwide since their debut project in 2005 and garnered more than 3.8 million followers on social media and over 34.5 million views on YouTube. Jesus Culture is focused on equipping a generation to transform society by bringing people into an encounter with God’s love through worship and discipleship. The songs they release capture the heart of the movement.

 

bible trivia
bible trivia

Published on Jul 13, 2018

SUBSCRIBE 1.4K
Announcing the Jesus Culture Nights of Worship – Living with a Fire Tour! Come join Jesus Culture, Chris Quilala, Kim Walker-Smith, Bryan & Katie Torwalt, Chris McClarney, Banning Liebscher, and Nathan Edwardson for an amazing night of worship, teaching and fellowship. For more information visit www.premierproductions.com

The Hall of Fame: Kim Walker Smith

CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK
CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK
Kim Walker Smith

Jesus Culture Movement

Kim Walker-Smith, founding member the Jesus Culture Movement.

Has grown to become one of the most influential female voices in Christian music. Her passionate and uninhibited worship, captured so often on Jesus Culture’s live recordings, has become key in the worship movement that is currently taking place throughout the nations.

Today, Kim lives just outside Sacramento, California with her husband Skyler, their 2 boys, Wyatt and Bear, and their daughter, Maisie. Kim is passionate about raising up other worship leaders, encouraging women to pursue their dreams, and she feels honored to travel the world and lead others in encountering Jesus. Are you #Livingwitha🔥

 

CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK
CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK

Published on Aug 1, 2018

Official live video for “Not Afraid” by Jesus Culture. Find this song on the new album, Living With A Fire, available now! Subscribe to Jesus Culture on YouTube: http://smarturl.it/JesusCultureSub Get the album here: https://jcltr.lnk.to/firealbumYD Join JC on: Instagram: http://instagram.com/jesusculture Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jesusculture Twitter: http://twitter.com/jesusculture

 

CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK
CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK

Published on Jun 2, 2014

“Unstoppable Love” – the album from the Jesus Culture band is available now! SUBSCRIBE to the Jesus Culture channel: http://smarturl.it/JesusCultureSub?IQ… CD/BluRay: http://jcw.bz/uljc iTunes: http://jcw.bz/uli iTunes Movie: http://jcw.bz/ulim Listen on YouTube to Jesus Culture’s NEW album, Love Has A Name, here:

2018 Christian Music Hall Of Fame Award.

Kim Walker Smith.

Christian Webmaster Hall of Fame Network,  is proud to announce 1 individual. That is recognized with an Award for 20 years Musical Excellence. 

Kim Walker Smith
Kim Walker Smith

Kim Walker-Smith

Christian Music Hall of Fame Award 2018

Legendary Christian Music Artist: Kim Walker-Smith a founding member of the Jesus Culture Movement.

Has grown to become one of the most influential female voices in Christian music. Her passionate and uninhibited worship, captured so often on Jesus Culture’s live recordings, has become key in the worship movement that is currently taking place throughout the nations.

Today, Kim lives just outside Sacramento, California with her husband Skyler, their 2 boys, Wyatt and Bear, and their daughter, Maisie. Kim is passionate about raising up other worship leaders, encouraging women to pursue their dreams, and she feels honored to travel the world and lead others in encountering Jesus. Are you #Livingwitha🔥 

 

Published on Jul 14, 2018

Official live video for “Freedom” by Jesus Culture ft. Kim Walker-Smith. Find this song on the new album, Living With A Fire, available now! Subscribe to Jesus Culture on YouTube: http://smarturl.it/JesusCultureSub Get the album here: https://jcltr.lnk.to/firealbumYD Stream “Freedom” Spotify: https://jcltr.lnk.to/livingwithafireY… Apple Music: https://jcltr.lnk.to/livingwithafireY… Amazon Unlimited: https://jcltr.lnk.to/livingwithafireY… Download “Freedom” iTunes: https://jcltr.lnk.to/livingwithafireY… Amazon Music: https://jcltr.lnk.to/livingwithafireY… Google Play: https://jcltr.lnk.to/livingwithafireY… Join JC on: Instagram: http://instagram.com/jesusculture Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jesusculture Twitter: http://twitter.com/jesusculture

 

CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK
CHRISTIAN WEBMASTER NETWORK
Kim Walker Smith
Kim Walker Smith

Kim Walker-Smith has quickly become one of the strongest voices for the current youth revival. She is a passionate worship leader with an anointing to bring an entire generation into an encounter with God. All of those who are in a worship service led by Kim will catch her contagious love to worship. She has many interests and at the core of them all is a heart for justice, love, and God’s presence. Kim is one of the senior leaders in the Jesus Culture movement and one of the worship leaders in the Jesus Culture band. She and her husband Skyler, lead worship, teach, and impart around the world.

Christian Webmaster Hall of Fame Network

To be eligible: Individual artist or band must have released its first commercial recording at least 20 years prior to the year of induction. We are a nonprofit organization that tells the story of Christian Music’s global impact around the world.

Christian Webmaster Hall of Fame Network, is proud to announce Hall of Fame Award. For 20 years Musical Excellence. Kim Walker-Smit

Herod’s Temple

Herod’s Temple

‎The inner courts of Herod’s Temple were accessible by 10 gates, through which only Jews could enter. Inside there were several chambers and a courtyard where sacrifices were made. At one end was the holy place—a two-room sanctuary used by Jewish priests. The expansive building project of Herod’s Second Temple and Temple Mount was completed in approximately AD 62–64, only to be destroyed by the Romans in AD 70.

To continue your Bible Study, Click here

Virtual reality tour of ancient Jerusalem.

Start at the beginning  or  Click on a link below

HEROD’S TEMPLE  /  HEROD’S TEMPLE, TWO /

THE HOLY OF HOLIES / THE FIRST TEMPLE  /

THE TABERNACLE   JERUSALEM 34 AD  /

ISRAELITE ENCAMPMENT /  ANCIENT JERICHO /

MORE IS COMING SOON.

 

Christian Index

Do you want to learn how to build a website?

So you want to build a website?

Want to know more about website building?

Have you wondered why, it’s hard to get on Google search?

Ever noticed how company websites, have it better on Google search?

Don’t you just hate it when, you can’t find your website on Google search?

But wait, there’s more As if that’s not enough, we’re not through yet

STARTING AN INTERNET MINISTRY,

How to build a Church website with WordPress

How to build a website from scratch

Free Website Hosting Reviews

WordPress themes for a church website

How to create a free website

Hosting Ministry Websites

How to Make Money from your Website?

How to build a internet ministry

The holy of holies

the holy of holies

‎The holy of holies 

The holy of holies was the innermost chamber of Solomon’s temple; it contained only two gold-inlaid cherubim and the ark of the covenant (1 Kgs 8:6). The high priest was permitted to enter the holy of holies only once a year to bring an offering of blood. This was the Day of Atonement, now known as Yom Kippur.

To continue your Bible Study, Click here

 

Virtual reality tour of ancient Jerusalem.

Start at the beginning  or  Click on a link below

Herod’s Temple  /  Herod’s Temple, Two /  The holy of holies /

The First Temple  /  The Tabernacle  /  Jerusalem 34 AD  /

Israelite Encampment /  Ancient Jericho /  More is coming soon.

Christian Index

Do you want to learn how to build a website?

So you want to build a website?

Want to know more about website building?

Have you wondered why, it’s hard to get on Google search?

Ever noticed how company websites, have it better on Google search?

Don’t you just hate it when, you can’t find your website on Google search?

But wait, there’s more As if that’s not enough, we’re not through yet

STARTING AN INTERNET MINISTRY,

How to build a Church website with WordPress

How to build a website from scratch

Free Website Hosting Reviews

WordPress themes for a church website

How to create a free website

Hosting Ministry Websites

How to Make Money from your Website?

How to build a internet ministry

The First Temple

The First Temple

‎The First Temple

The First Temple, erected by King Solomon, was built to replace the Tabernacle and house the Ark of the Covenant. The Temple was completed in 957 BC after seven years of labor, but it was destroyed by the Babylonians in 587 BC.

 

To continue your Bible Study, Click here

Christian Index

 

Do you want to learn how to build a website?

So you want to build a website?

Want to know more about website building?

Have you wondered why, it’s hard to get on Google search?

Ever noticed how company websites, have it better on Google search?

Don’t you just hate it when, you can’t find your website on Google search?

But wait, there’s more As if that’s not enough, we’re not through yet

STARTING AN INTERNET MINISTRY,

How to build a Church website with WordPress

How to build a website from scratch

Free Website Hosting Reviews

WordPress themes for a church website

How to create a free website

Hosting Ministry Websites

How to Make Money from your Website?

How to build a internet ministry